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Children's Trauma Therapy Project - Yaru Water
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Children’s Trauma Therapy Project

The Yaru Foundation is excited to announce the launch of its latest project, to help provide world-class therapeutic treatment for Indigenous children who have experienced severe trauma.

Yaru will be working alongside not for profit organisation, Rafiki Mwema, whose ambassador Dr. Daniel Hughes pioneered a therapeutic approach designed to help children who have experienced trauma to build positive attachments and relationships, and to help them recover from the impact of the trauma and live a fulfilling life.

The therapeutic training will be delivered to parents, professionals and carers within the sector, who work specifically with, or care for Indigenous children who have experienced such trauma. This may include physical, mental or sexual abuse.

Trauma is sadly life-changing and heartbreaking all at the same time. It can lead to tragic outcomes for many. Rafiki Mwema has been delivering this therapeutic approach to children in Kenya who are as young as one year old, and who have suffered from severe and repeated sexual abuse. The proof and effectiveness of the approach is there when you see the children grow and flourish.

Anne-Marie of Rafiki Mwema who will be delivering the training said:

“Yaru is making it possible for us to deliver world-class therapy to those most vulnerable. By creating a trauma informed team around the families and services, the outcome for the way that carers can support and improve the lives of children is multiplied. The training and support of carers will impact each and every child that they care for, now and in the future. They will be able to fully understand the complexities of the behaviours shown by the children, learn to connect and understand the emotions that drive those behaviours, and make life long changes to the children and young peoples outcomes. If the professionals that support the carers have the same understanding, it ensures that the children are supported in a seamless way.”

Tessa Martin of Yaru Water added:

“We have always wanted to implement projects that support young children in our Indigenous communities, particularly those most at risk. These children have faced traumas that we can’t even begin to imagine. By delivering this therapeutic approach we know that we are helping to give them the best chance of a fulfilling future. Just as they deserve.”

More information to follow. Stay up to date by signing up to our newsletter here.

 

 

 

Please note that the image used within this post is a stock image provided by Rafiki Mwema with their full permission. These children are in no way associated to the project as it would be unsuitable to use images of children and parents/carers who are undergoing therapeutic support of this nature.

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